InvitoHealth: Health News Headlines

Low Resting Heart Rate Tied to Stalking Behaviors in Men

By Traci Pedersen
October 3rd, 2022

Men with a low resting heart rate are at significantly greater risk of engaging in stalking behavior, according to a new study at Sam Houston State University. The average adult resting heart rate is between 60-100 beats per minute. Anything lower than 60 beats per minute is considered a low resting heart rate. Based on arousal theory, people with low levels of arousal are less fearful, more likely to seek opportunities to pursue victims to feel stimulated, and are more likely to exhibit impulsive behaviors. Having a low resting heart rate is a biological factor previously linked to aggression and [More]

Tightly Wound DNA in Brain Tied to Schizophrenia

By Psych Central News Editor
October 3rd, 2022

New research has discovered that people with schizophrenia have certain brain cells where their DNA stays too tightly wound. When DNA is too tightly wound, it can stop other genes from expressing themselves in their normal pattern. The new findings suggest that drugs already in development for other diseases might eventually offer hope as a treatment for schizophrenia and related conditions in the elderly. The research shows the deficit is especially pronounced in younger people. This suggests that treatment might be most effective early on at minimizing or even reversing symptoms of schizophrenia Schizophrenia is a usually-serious mental disorder characterized [More]

Even Those Eager to Learn Cringe at Negative Job Reviews

By Rick Naurert PhD
October 2nd, 2022

A new study suggests a critical job performance evaluation can have a negative effect on any employee, despite an individual’s optimism or the managerial intent of motivation or education. Dr. Satoris Culbertson, an assistant professor of management at Kansas State University, studied how people view positive or negative feedback. Perhaps not surprisingly, he found that no one, even those motivated to learn, likes  negative performance reviews. He also believes that negative feedback is different from constructive feedback and that managers must be careful in how they perform the review. Culbertson and collaborators at Eastern Kentucky University and Texas A&M University [More]

Updated Maslow’s Pyramid of Needs

By Rick Naurert PhD
October 2nd, 2022

A team of psychologists have updated a cornerstone of modern psychology — Abraham Maslow’s pyramid of needs. Maslow’s pyramid describes human motivations from the most basic to the most advanced. According to experts, Maslow’s time-tested pyramid, first proposed in the 1940s, needed to be updated to reflect the last 50 years of research. A team of psychologists, including two from Arizona State University, recast the pyramid. In doing so, they have taken on one of psychology’s iconic symbols and have generated some controversy along the way. The revamp of Maslow’s pyramid reflects new findings and theory from fields like neuroscience, [More]

Multisymptom Illness Still Plagues Gulf War Vets

By Traci Pedersen
October 2nd, 2022

American veterans who served in the 1990-1991 Gulf War continue to face higher rates of chronic and mysterious mental and physical ailments, compared to veterans of other recent wars in the Middle East. In fact, according to an updated review in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, researchers found that veterans of the Gulf War are more than twice as likely to suffer from a variety of medically unexplained symptoms known as “multisymptom illness,” compared to Iraq/Afghanistan War veterans. Multisymptom illness (MSI), previously known as the Gulf War Syndrome, refers to chronic, unexplained symptoms that affect a variety of [More]

Job Autonomy Helps but High Status Jobs = Stress and Pressure

By Rick Naurert PhD
October 2nd, 2022

A new Canadian study finds  that while many  seek challenging work and greater levels of authority, some people  may not understand these workplace characteristics can have negative consequences. Dr. Scott Schieman, a sociologist from the University of Toronto, measured a range of work conditions using data from a national survey of 6,004 Canadian workers. To measure levels of job pressure, he asked study participants questions such as: “How often do you feel overwhelmed by how much you had to do at work?” “How often do you have to work on too many tasks at the same time?” and “How often [More]

Can Beta-Carotene Make You More Attractive?

By Traci Pedersen
October 1st, 2022

White males with high levels of carotenoids —  yellow and red pigments —  in their skin appear healthier and more attractive to females; but this skin tone does not necessarily signal good health, according to a new study published in the journal Behavioral Ecology. “Carotenoids are known to be responsible for the striking mating displays in many animal species,” said Yong Zhi Foo, Ph.D., author and postgraduate animal biology student at the University of Western Australia. “Our study is one of the first to causally demonstrate that carotenoids can affect attractiveness in humans as well. It also reaffirms the results [More]

New Method to Assess Stress Shows Promise

By Traci Pedersen
October 1st, 2022

Researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center have found a new way to understand and potentially help reduce stress symptoms. Their approach focuses on the source of the body’s stress responses and whether the response is mostly mediated by the sympathetic or parasympathetic nervous system. Stress responses are managed by the brain. Prior research shows the right side of the brain is involved with sympathetic responses, while the left side is associated with parasympathetic responses. The sympathetic nervous system mediates the fight-or-flight stress response, and creates almost instant physical reactions, such as increased heart rate and blood pressure, changes in [More]

Problematic Smartphone Use Tied to Lower Grades, Mental Health Issues in College Students

By Traci Pedersen
October 1st, 2022

In a new survey of 3,425 university students, one in five respondents said they engaged in problematic smartphone use which in turn was tied to lower grades, mental health problems and a higher number of sexual partners. Previous research has linked excessive smartphone use to mental health issues such as anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and problems with self-esteem. In the new study, published in the Journal of Behavioral Addictions, a research team from the University of Chicago, University of Cambridge, and the University of Minnesota developed the Health and Addictive Behaviours Survey to [More]

New Insights into Autism Spectrum Disorders

By Rick Naurert PhD
October 1st, 2022

Experts estimate that nearly 1 in 88 children are affected by autism spectrum disorders. Symptoms can range from mild personality traits to severe intellectual disability and seizures. Heredity plays a large role in autism, and professionals say an understanding of the altered genetic pathways is critical for diagnosis and treatment. Unfortunately, the complexities of the genetic variances responsible for disorders have challenged researchers. “Autism is the most inheritable of neurodevelopmental disorders,” said Rajini Rao, Ph.D.,  of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Md., “but identifying the underlying genes is difficult since no single gene contributes more than a tiny fraction of [More]